Artists

The artists on this page were not ukulele players, but rather entertainers and/or musicians who either composed or popularised the songs found here.

Hetty King

George Lashwood

Ella Sheilds

Mark Sheridan

Vesta Tilley

Vesta Victoria

Nellie Wallace

Marie Lloyd

Big Bill Broonzy

Blind Boy Fuller

Muddy Waters

Hetty King

Hetty King,
along with Ella Sheilds and Vesta Tilley, was  one of the most esteemed male impersonators of the twentieth century.At the time of her death in 1972, she  was still performing the hits that made her famous. In one of her later recordings, in a song entitled “Tell Her The Old Old Story” she sings: “There are many ways of making love, which one of them is the best? Some like to whisper it with mad egalia, others like to strum it on the ukulelia.” Something to consider!

Ella Sheilds

George Lashwood
was a handsome singer who was known as “ The Beau Brummel Of The Halls “. His best known song is probably “Twilight ”, although my ultimate favourite would have to be " Send For A Policeman."  I do not know if a recording  of  "Fol-de-rol-lol " exists.

Ella Sheilds
was an American who established a firm fan base in the British Isles. She will always be associated with the song “ Burlington Bertie “ and “ If you Knew Susie” ( the first Music Hall recording I ever heard.Thank you Mr. Jeavons!) I love “ Show Me the Way To Go Home “ and sing it often after a night out.

Mark Sheridan
This witty and wise Music Hall comedian died a tragic
death in a Glasgow park. He made “ I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside “ and “ Who Were You With Last Night” a part of our collective consciousness. For more detailed information on this performer, please see www.marksheridan.org.

George Lashwood
Mark Sheridan
Vesta Tilley

Vesta Tilley
is considered by many Music Hall aficionados to have been the best male impersonator of her day. That she was immensely popular and made a fortune goes without saying, but I cannot say that I enjoy her recordings as much as Ella’s or Hetty’s. Nevertheless, she  had a special quality that her audiences adored.

Nellie Wallace

Vesta Victoria
was on the halls from an early age and is best remembered for " Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me A Bow-wow " and " Waiting At The Church " which are both included here.

Vesta Victoria

Nellie Wallace
A female grotesque comedienne (though not evident from the glamorous photo) , Nellie had a repertoire of songs that revolved around jilting and disappointed love affairs.  She is the lady who made “Under The Bed” a hit in the 1930’s.  “Let’s Have A Tiddley At The Milk Bar” is one of my favourites.

Marie Lloyd
One of the greatest comediennes of the Music Hall stage and worshipped by the public, Marie's extensive repertoire included " A Little Of What You Fancy Does You Good " and " Dont Dilly Dally ".  The latter was also sung by her daughter.

Muddy Waters Hailing from Mississippi, this  modern bluesman inspired a whole generation of guitar players from the 1940's  onwards.  " High Heel Sneakers "  goes down well on the uke.

Blind Boy Fuller     He didn't live long but he recorded a considerable number of songs. "Truckin My Blues Away " is a  classic.

Big Bill Broonzy
My biggest influence on the acoustic guitar, Broonzy was a master player and songwriter who blended gospel, blues and folk to create his distinct sound. " This Train  is Bound For Glory " is a joy to sing and play on the ukulele.

All My Songs Now Available at cdbaby.com
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Big Bill Broonzy

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